27
Jun
08

The Rise and Decline of an International Jetsetting Philosopher

Written Yesterday in the Dallas/Ft. Worth Airport:

So I was still in Beijing at the beginning of the month, until the 9th. I then came to Chicago, and stayed with my future in-laws for a few days, before returning to Madison for apartment hunting for a few days. Then, back to Chicago for a day or two, before coming to Houston to see family and friends for a week. As I type this, I’m at the airport in Houston, waiting for a flight that will take me to Dallas/Ft. Worth, before depositing me back in Chicago. I’ll crash there tonight, and then it’s back to Madison for a night or two. Then, it’s to the Madison airport, where I’ll catch a flight to Portland for Rand Camp, where I’ll be staying for a week. Only then when I return to Madison, hopefully to finally move into my new apartment. But of course, even that’s temporary. About a month later, I’ll be off for Washington DC, for yet another conference.

Mind you, I’m not complaining. Not really, anyway, because doing so much traveling is satisfying in its own way, as I like being able to see so many people and places in such a short time. I’m only saying that I’ll be very much looking forward to returning to Madison after the trip to Portland so that I can actually move in, and I can stop being, well, sort of homeless, and having to get my mail all forwarded to my parents’ address in Texas.

I’ll also look forward to a return to life without all the useless security theatre that makes traveling by air, which should be a pleasant experience, much more of a hassle, and even sort of depressing, considering that when you travel by air, you realize just how much arbitrary power has been seized by the federal government in the name of homeland security. The courts have found that the federal government doesn’t even have to show from what law or other act of Congress authorizes it demand that passengers carry government-issued ID cards, and since no such law was as far as anyone can tell, ever passed, at best it exists in a kind of legal twilight zone, a practice that looks all the world like it’s unconstitutional, but without a specific law or act that can be brought to the courts to be fought as unconstitutional.

Well. I still maintain that traveling is fun. Government mischief hasn’t changed that just yet. Nonetheless, I long for the semblance of regularity and settlement I’ll enjoy in July.

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